“Often the first time a pregnant women come to hospital is when she’s been trying to deliver at home without progress. She’s in urgent need of a Caesarean section.”

Eva is a Fellow of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and of the West African College of Surgeons. She at present heads the Intensive Care Unit at the only Tertiary Hospital in Sierra Leone and lectures Nurse Anaesthetists in that country

Let’s talk about anaesthesia. Why is access to safe anaesthesia important for women?

Anaesthesia isn’t considered a lucrative and fashionable option for post-graduate doctors, but without safe anaesthesia – which also includes post-operative care – there’s increased morbidity and sometimes mortality.

It’s of vital importance to women, especially in low-resource countries. Often the first time a pregnant women come to hospital is when she’s been trying to deliver at home without progress. She’s in urgent need of a Caesearean section.

Can you talk us through how you handle a case like that?

I recall a patient who had been in prolonged labour at home and presented at hospital in a collapsed state. We couldn’t get her blood pressure and her pulse was weak and thready. We could only get a line in through the internal jugular vein.

It was obvious we were dealing with a ruptured uterus.

This is something you would never see in a country with wider access to surgical services and we had to do surgical intervention and resuscitation at the same time because her heart was so unstable.

Of course a dead foetus was delivered and the bleeding was stemmed only after a hysterectomy. But the mother’s life was saved.

What changes have you seen over your career that have made anaesthesia safer?

The greatest change to safe surgical care has been the widespread use of spinal anaesthesia. In settings where there is no oxygen supply, little or no monitoring, poor power general anaesthesia is out of the question – it’s very risky and can contribute to high maternal mortality rates.

Let’s talk about anaesthesia.  Why is access to safe anaesthesia important for women?

Anaesthesia isn’t considered a lucrative and fashionable option for post-graduate doctors, but without safe anaesthesia – which also includes post-operative care – there’s increased morbidity and sometimes mortality.

It’s of vital importance to women, especially in low-resource countries.  Often the first time a pregnant women come to hospital is when she’s been trying to deliver at home without progress.  She’s in urgent need of a Caesearean section.

What changes have you seen over your career that have made anaesthesia safer?

The greatest change to safe surgical care has been the widespread use of spinal anaesthesia.  In settings where there is no oxygen supply, little or no monitoring, poor power general anaesthesia is out of the question – it’s very risky and can contribute to high maternal mortality rates.

Who is it important to educate?

Everyone.

In rural Sierra Leone, anaesthesia services are provided by nurses, who must be constantly updated.  Failure to provide continuing education can make anaesthesia very unsafe.

At the same time, further education of pregnant women to encourage them to visit ante-natal clinics would lead to further reductions in mortality.