medical equipment

2014/03/06

Margaret Bugyei-Kyei

“You’ve got to wear white for three months.” Margaret is a senior ODP at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London.Read more →

2014/03/05

Dr Rebecca Jacob

“Patient on the ground, instruments boiled over a kerosene stove by the light of a hurricane lamp.” Rebecca recently retiredRead more →

2014/03/05

Dr Marianne Stephen

“There might be a more acceptable level of risk, but the grief – that kind of grief is never normalized.”Read more →

2014/03/05

Dr Jane Fitch

“The comparison between resources can make anaesthesia a very different experience. It makes you realize how wasteful we are, howRead more →

2014/03/05

Dr Isabeau Walker

“Safe surgery should be a basic right that is available to all women who require it during childbirth.” Isabeau isRead more →

2014/03/05

Dr Queeneth Kalu

“They say ‘Abasi Akan uman ikwa,’ meaning ‘God forbid delivery by knife!’” Queeneth is a Senior Lecturer and Chairman,Medical AdvisoryRead more →

2014/03/05

Evelyn Felicia Somah

“Back home they have this thing – if you’re going to surgery, you’re going to die.” Evelyn is a seniorRead more →

2014/03/05

Comfort Osagie-Ogbeide

“You have to buy your life.” Comfort works in hospital administration in London. She is originally from Nigeria. What isRead more →

2014/02/05

Dr Amy Keightley

“In the UK we have swabs with a radio band so that if you lose one in the body duringRead more →

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Margaret Bugyei-Kyei

“You’ve got to wear white for three months.”

Margaret is a senior ODP at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. She trained as a nurse and then in anaesthesia in Ghana.

How do you celebrate a safe C-section in Ghana?

It’s a big celebration! You’ve got to wear white for three months. There has been so much fear that you won’t make it through alive, so everyone is celebrating, rejoicing. “Thank God you’ve come out of surgery successfully,” everyone tells you.

Here you don’t have that tradition – it’s just an everyday fact of life.

Is surgery so unsafe?

There’s a lot of fear, anxiety. People believe that you go into surgery and you don’t come back – because really that happens a lot.

They think it’s the operation that killed you, but surgery is essential when you need to do it. It’s education, transportation, poverty – all these things that delay treatment. By the time you’re ready it’s too late.

What are the barriers to safe surgery for women in Ghana?

Resources, equipment – poverty. Most patients come and they have nothing – but they still need to provide everything. Relatives are sent to the cash and carry to buy the medications, they have to donate the blood before any treatment takes place.

In the U.K. you get emergency care without hesitation. If you need something in the theatre your hands reach out to it, there it is. We have monitors; we have drugs; we have a cupboard of machines to help with difficult intubation, or locating a vein. What do I do back home? How do I get help?

Is equipment a big issue?

Most of the equipment sent to Africa is second-hand – some isn’t even working but it’s dumped on us. There’s a lack of everything. We reuse everything.

Patients die for lack of basic monitoring equipment. Women go into labour and they don’t even have a place to rest their head – a bed is like equipment to put their heads on.

What is it like to deliver care in this setting?

It’s tragic. Tragic for the patient and tragic for the nurse. You are going to let a patient lose their life for no reason – you could have saved them easily with the right equipment, access. So you withdraw; your spirit is demoralized.

And telling the families is so hard. It’s difficult enough to get a surgery. They get there and think – please, now it’s going to be ok.

Why did you train in anaesthesia?

First I trained in nursing. I’m the type who really loves caring for people. But at the time I was working in theatres we didn’t have enough anaesthetists – so I decided I could be a role model for my colleagues. At the time I was the only female who trained as a nurse anaesthetist on the course.

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Dr Rebecca Jacob

“Patient on the ground, instruments boiled over a kerosene stove by the light of a hurricane lamp.”

Rebecca recently retired as a Professor of Anaesthesia at the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India. She now works as a consultant anaesthetist in Bangalore. Her focus is on paediatric anaesthesia and, in particular, working with children with clefts with the Smile Train charity.

Why is access to safe obstetric surgery essential for women?

No brainer! Everyone wants to be safe, even when the surgery is minor – let alone when there are two lives at stake.

You’ve helped to develop a training programme for students going out to work in a rural setting. What are their biggest concerns?

They feel very much alone. They’ve trained in a protected environment, with the safeguard of senior mentors. That doesn’t exist in the rural areas.

Suddenly, as well as gaps in their knowledge and poor support services, they have to worry about things we take for granted in the city such as uninterrupted water, electricity, suction – its an immense responsibility.

An operation can become very dangerous, very quickly – but really you don’t have a choice.

Can you give an example?

A student and her husband went to take up their new post in rural North East India. That same night a woman with prolonged obstructed labour was bought to them. Her only chance was an emergency Caesarean section.

With no electricity they performed the operation – patient on the ground, instruments boiled over a kerosene stove by the light of a hurricane lamp.

What changes would you like to see?

Those students came back to Vellore, obtained post grad degrees and went back to the same area. They set up a good hospital with three operating theatres, a sterilizing machine for instruments, generators for electricity. The only problem is that their oxygen and supplies have to come by boat – or four hours by road from the nearest airport!

So we need better training opportunities for our doctors and nurses. Improved facilities – hospitals, drugs, electricity, water, equipment in rural areas. Better salaries, housing and schools for the families and children of health care workers so that they will want to continue to work in rural areas.

This is the greatest loss we in developing countries suffer – we spend a lot on the education of our doctors most of whom leave to work in ‘greener pastures.’

What do you tell your students?

Don’t ever stop caring. No matter how little each of us can achieve, that little bit could still make a difference in one life.

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Dr Marianne Stephen

“There might be a more acceptable level of risk, but the grief – that kind of grief is never normalized.”

Marianne is an obstetrics and gynaecology registrar who has worked with Médecins Sans Frontières in Pakistan and on the border of Myanmar and India.

Why is access to safe surgery an important issue for women’s health?

Women of childbearing age are a unique group of patients in that they’re usually well when the come to you. Childbirth is one of the unique circumstances where an operation is performed on someone who is not sick, making the decision to do so very important.

For a woman in this country it’s important to think: if this was your daughter, your mother, your sister, going in healthy to hospital to have a baby, how much of a tragedy it would be if they died. The tragedy is the same wherever you go in the world. There might be a more acceptable level of risk, but the grief – that kind of grief is never normalized.

How does surgery in a low-resource setting become unsafe?

The problems are so complex, on many different levels, from bureaucracy at the top end to the grassroots clinical level where local healthcare staff can be extremely overburdened, often working in an environment lacking support and training. It can be very disheartening, on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week; going home and waiting for the phone to ring them back to an ill-equipped theatre with lack of staff and little recovery care.

These people may be the only healthcare professionals for miles around and as a result their work takes over their lives.

The working environment itself presents a challenge. An unreliable electricity supply can mean performing a caesarean by torchlight with very poor visibility or in the blistering heat with lack of fans or air conditioning. This results in a very difficult operating environment for the surgeon. Poor lighting makes it difficult to see what you are doing and a hot operating theatre is an infection risk, not to mention the surgeon can barely stand by the end of the operation.

And when that reality is also conflict zone?

One of the first things to collapse is the structure of healthcare, although despite this women will continue to have babies.

A distressed population will present with many different medical problems, some like trauma are linked directly to conflict but what persists in any affected population are the problems in maternal and child health. Aid workers going into an emergency zone will find themselves performing many caesarean sections and the decision to operate on someone in such circumstances can be a difficult one.

Can you describe a case that stayed with you?

Probably the first post-partum hysterectomy I did for a woman with uncontrollable bleeding following delivery. The staff were able to recognize very quickly that she was unwell, which was the first life saving step. We used our small but well equipped field theatre which had just enough of the right surgical instruments to perform the operation. She had been bleeding for a week before she got to hospital and without the surgery would have died very quickly.

Looking back I can see that it was really good teamwork but at the time it felt a little like a miracle. I came in the next morning and she was sitting up in bed, nursing the baby and eating biscuits.

What’s the role of the visiting healthcare worker?

It’s extremely important not to go in, do operations and then leave again, without leaving any legacy. That’s even more disruptive.

An obstetrician performs about 5 key procedures regularly, all of which are potentially life saving, in a safe surgical setting. By teaching someone to perform a safe caesarean you allow them to go on and teach 5 more, which is important in building a lasting healthcare structure in resource poor settings.

Healthcare workers in ‘developed’ countries have so much to learn from working in low resource settings. The current trend in our training is moving away from the question ‘did you ever do any work abroad’ and towards asking ‘why didn’t you?’. This can only help to broaden our horizons.

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Dr Jane Fitch

“The comparison between resources can make anaesthesia a very different experience. It makes you realize how wasteful we are, how disposable everything is for us.”

Jane is President of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

People don’t always recognize the role of anaesthesia in safe surgery. What can you tell me about it?

There are very few medical specialties where you can literally take care of people from birth – and actually, pre-birth – all the way to end of life. Anaesthesia cares for everyone, and everything in between.

What about in lower-resource countries where you’ve worked?

The comparison between resources can make anaesthesia a very different experience. It makes you realize how wasteful we are, how disposable everything is for us.

In the U.S. we have all kinds of fancy warmers for giving blood products and fluid. In Egypt we draped it across some lights to get the ambient heat. Working in China in the late 1980s you’d see rooms chock full of inoperable equipment. Purchased or donated, it was broken and there was no one who could maintain it, no spare parts.

We know that 70,000 operating rooms around the world don’t even have a basic pulse oximeter [a monitoring device essential for safe anaesthesia]. Literally a couple of billion people don’t have access to safe anaesthetic and surgical care.

How important is access to safe surgery for women’s health?

It’s critically important. The medical care of women during their childbearing years – the majority of their lifetime – is primarily obstetric and gynecological. It’s critical that all around the world, women have access to these surgical procedures.

And when safe surgery isn’t available?

There are complications that have a huge personal and social impact on a woman and her family.

If she doesn’t have appropriate care during childbirth she risks damage to the birth canal and development of fistula that can lead to incontinence. A woman in low-resource settings without the ability to have this repaired can be ostracized from her family, her social network, her employment.

And the mom’s status clearly impacts and somewhat determines a lot of what the child’s life will be like.

What can we do to support safer anaesthesia around the world?

Nicholas Greene, one of the ‘founding fathers’ of modern anaesthesia, recognized early on the constraints that low-resource settings have in being able to provide safe surgical and anaesthetic care. His focus was on training and education, and our Global Humanitarian Outreach committee and Charitable Foundation have really taken off from there in the last decade.

What is your hope for the future of women in global anaesthesia?

It’s only in the last 40-odd years that we’ve moved away from a 25-30% female minority in the field of anaesthesia in America. I hope that women will realize the critical role that we do play in the U.S. and beyond – women all over the world are vital for providing the safest anaesthetic care possible.

We all need surgery and anaesthesia at some point – but in particular I’ll go back to the fact that we know that women really need obstetric care at certain times to prevent complications that will negatively impact themselves, their children and their families. It’s just critically important.

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Dr Isabeau Walker

“Safe surgery should be a basic right that is available to all women who require it during childbirth.”

Isabeau is a Consultant Paediatric Anaesthetist in London, Vice President of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and a trustee of Lifebox Foundation.

Who needs a Caesarean section?

We are so used to people talking about caesarean section rates that are too high, and women who are ‘too posh to push’. But for a woman in obstructed labour or with a low-lying placenta, a caesarean section is a life saving procedure, for herself, the baby, or for both…

Safe surgery should be a basic right that is available to all women who require it during childbirth.

Is this not the case?

No, this is definitely not the case. Thousands of mother’s lives could be saved if surgery was prioritised within all health systems. Tens of thousands could be saved from debilitating injuries, and millions of stillbirths, neonatal deaths, or newborn birth injuries could be avoided.

The rates for caesarean section in poor communities in sub-Saharan Africa or southern Asia are consistently less than 2%. It isn’t clear what the ‘minimum’ rate for caesarean section should be, although some academics have suggested that at least 5% of all births should be by c-section; so it is likely that many women die in these communities because they don’t have access to safe surgery.

Thousands of mother’s lives could be saved if surgery was prioritised within all health systems, not just those in high-income countries. Many more women could be saved from debilitating injuries, and millions of stillbirths, neonatal deaths, or newborn birth injuries could be avoided.

What does this mean for a woman in labour in a low-resource country?

Lamula’s story is a true account written by Juliet Tumwebaze, an anaesthetic officer working in Uganda.

Lamula was a mother from a rural village in obstructed labour, carried on the back of her husband’s bicycle ‘amidst her screaming’ for 4 hours to the local health centre. When she got there, they found that the hospital was not equipped to help her.

WHO has estimated that 800 women die every day due to complications of pregnancy or childbirth, and 7300 babies are stillborn, with almost half of stillbirths occurring when the mother is in labour. 99% of these deaths occur in low-resource countries and could be avoided.

Is global surgery keeping pace with technology?

As we develop ever more sophisticated equipment to improve patient safety in high-income countries, patients in low-income countries are denied even the most basic of surgical care. The gap between what we know and what we can deliver in poorer parts of the world seems to be widening.

Does that mean available surgery becomes unsafe?

Yes, definitely. A number of publications in the last few years have surveyed facilities in rural hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa, and found that they are not staffed or equipped to deliver even basic surgery. So there is poor access to surgery, and when surgery is provided, the essential equipment to provide safe surgery is often not there.

What are the repercussions?

When a young woman dies during childbirth, it is a tragedy for the whole family. The health, education and economic prospects for the entire family are affected, and the risk of the surviving children dying is increased. An effective way to make a difference is for patients to stand up and tell their stories, and to demand better services. Sadly, these women’s voices are rarely heard, so it is particularly important on International Woman’s Day that we tell their stories in solidarity.

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Dr Queeneth Kalu

“They say ‘Abasi Akan uman ikwa,’ meaning ‘God forbid delivery by knife!'”

Queeneth is a Senior Lecturer and Chairman,Medical Advisory Committee at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital in Cross River State, Nigeria.

Do women recognize that surgery can play a life-saving role in safe childbirth?

In my locality they say ‘Abasi Akan uman ikwa,’ meaning ‘God forbid delivery by knife!’ When it comes to childbirth, most Nigerian women prefer a vaginal delivery, meaning going to hospital is a last resort.

This translates to late presentation after laboring for hours in the traditional birth attendant’s home. They commonly arrive with obstructed labour, severe preeclampsia, foetal distress, haemorrhage – conditions requiring surgical intervention to save mother, baby or both.

The importance of safe anaesthesia in these emergency patients, arriving in suboptimal states into our very challenging health service system, cannot be over-emphasized.

What kind of challenges?

As a trainee anaesthetist I once had a patient who needed a Caesarean section at night. As soon as I gave her the spinal anaesthesia, there was a public power outage.

There was no back up power supply in the theatre. W e had no automated patient monitors at the time. We put on the small light of the laryngoscope, checked blood pressure every 5 minutes, palpated the pulse, kept communication with the patient and waited in the theatre till the anaesthesia receded.

We’re familiar with occasional power outages during surgery and will usually carry on with torchlights until power from the generator or public supply is restored. In this case we felt it was too risky, so we returned the patient to the ward and surgery was done the following morning. These are not things we are proud of but the reality in Africa is: we work in a challenging environment.

Does experience of working in other countries change your perspective?

I witnessed a case of placenta acreta [a sever complication of pregnancy that often requires surgery] during my obstetric anaesthesia fellowship at Wolfson Medical Centre in Israel.

The early diagnosis and preparation of equipment, blood availability, personnel – obstetricians, anaesthesiologists, interventional radiologists, perfusionists, nurses…it was amazing. Such a sharp contrast to what’s available in our environment when we see the same condition.

I realised why our maternal mortality rates are so high and theirs so low. I realize that saving a woman’s life in an obstetric emergency situation, especially where there’s bleeding is more or less a warfare and must be treated as such. All hands must be on deck.

What are your goals for women in the healthcare profession?

My joy is that I have found my passion for public health being fulfilled along my career path, and I encourage women to rise to professional excellence.

They should strike a work life balance. Make the most of the opportunities that come their way, engage in community development projects. Share their knowledge through health education programs in churches, market places, media houses.

I pray that in the coming decades, women will not be looked upon in terms of gender but will be seen as too relevant to be ignored.

 

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Evelyn Felicia Somah

“Back home they have this thing – if you’re going to surgery, you’re going to die.”

Evelyn is a senior staff nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital. She was born in The Gambia, and trained in the U.K.

Why did you train as a nurse?

My grandma was a midwife, my mum was a nurse – it’s part of me. When I grew up my dad said – and you listed to your parents! – nursing doesn’t pay here, you need to study something else. So I trained as a secretary, I was working with the UN in The Gambia.

But when I moved to the U.K. I saw technology was changing – you don’t really need a secretary, you’ve got a computer. So I’m going to do what I love to do, what I wanted to do when I was a child.

Tell me about access to surgery in The Gambia.

In The Gambia, healthcare is the biggest issue. People are just dying from things that they shouldn’t, and women are suffering the most. They don’t have the right equipment, they don’t get emergency obstetric care. I know of a cousin who just died giving birth back home. They couldn’t stop the bleeding.

So where do you go if you need surgery?

I have an uncle who nearly died – he had fluid on his lungs, but he was rushed to Senegal, because they couldn’t diagnose him in The Gambia. Half an hour flight away – but he would have died if he’d stayed; he would have died if he wasn’t working for a bank which paid for him to go.

When people have money they can rush to Senegal. But when they don’t – you have lost your life.

Do people worry about unsafe surgery?

Back home they have this thing – if you’re going to surgery, you’re going to die. Take medication, go to the doctor – that’s fine. But if they’re putting you to sleep?

It’s because they haven’t seen successful surgery. People aren’t diagnosed soon enough, so the surgery is much more complicated. My dad – we lost him – when you’d talk about an operation he’d say “oh no, no – I don’t want anybody to cut my body.”

My mum, too, was diagnosed wrongly. She’d had the problem ten years, and by the time we were able to get her to America she only had two weeks. They used to give her cough mixture, but her heart was gone. The doctors couldn’t believe she had traveled so far.

How does this change?

People need to be educated. They need to be informed that surgery will help. For me, since I’ve been here, I’ve really changed my perspective. We were never taught that surgery could do that.

Both my parents gone because they couldn’t get diagnosed properly; they couldn’t get treated in time.

So many people visit Gambia, they can see all this. But it’s a tourist place for them. They go for the holiday and everything else is just put aside.

 You have so many difficult stories. I’m sorry to make you go through them all again.

I enjoy caring for people; I enjoy it so much. That’s why I’m in this field. I like helping people and I like education. I do health checks at my local church, and I always encourage women to take care of their health.

It’s ok. If telling stories can help to let people know what’s happening – if it can make a difference – then I want to share them.

 

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Comfort Osagie-Ogbeide

“You have to buy your life.”

Comfort works in hospital administration in London. She is originally from Nigeria.

What is your experience of surgery?

Well it saved my friend’s life. She needed a caesarean section for her second baby, and she survived. But it was very difficult.

Why is that?

The attention she needed wasn’t really there, due to lack of financial resources and unavailability of the right equipment in Government hospitals. She decided to go private but lacked the initial deposit. If you don’t have the money, you don’t get the treatment.

There’s so much pressure on the family. The price they may charge is huge, and of course if she’s pregnant the lady hasn’t been working. It pains you to see this happening – women dying from illnesses that are not supposed to take them. You have to buy your life.

So is it hard to trust in surgical care?

Recently I heard about a young lady who died from an incomplete operation. Not immediately – she went for a surgery to deliver a stillbirth and they left some products behind. She kept going for follow up, kept complaining that she had pains. She wasn’t wealthy, and her life didn’t get enough attention. She was neglected until she developed sepsis, and she died.

From a stillbirth. A tragedy followed by a tragedy. It is really difficult to trust surgical care.

Surgery is that line between life and death, and it’s the common belief that if you go into surgery you’re not likely to come back.

Has your attitude changed since you moved to the U.K.?

Here at least they’ve got the right equipment to look after the patient. I’ve come to realize that there’s nothing inherently dangerous about surgery when you need it and you do it safely.

It’s when you need it and they don’t have the resources for that. My friend and her baby almost wasted away. It’s just a nightmare. You don’t want to talk about it.

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Dr Amy Keightley

“In the UK we have swabs with a radio band so that if you lose one in the body during the operation you can identify it.”

Amy is an Obstetric and Gynaecology Registrar, recently returned from Hoima Hospital in Uganda, currently working at Lincoln County Hospital.

C-sections make up an enormous proportion of all surgeries in low-resource settings.

Yes, but the C-section rate in Uganda, if you look at the place as a whole, is actually very low. There’s not a lot of access to healthcare, and then you arrive at these facilities with a high volume of operations being done in a relatively small space – pockets of high-risk women, clumped together.

Without the training and experience of managing difficult labour, you can end up seeing C-section as a safer way out – without addressing the long-term consequences, and how risky the operation is itself.

So you get this situation where lower-risk women get surgery, and women who needed a C-section three days ago are waiting, waiting, waiting for days, because the theatre is always full.

What are the immediate risks?

Horrible post-natal infection; risk that the surgeon will pick up HIV or hepatitis because they don’t have the right equipment or training.

Resources are a huge problem. In the U.K. there’s someone whose whole job it is to look after the surgical instruments, keep track of equipment. And you can use swabs with a radio band so that if you lose one in the body during the operation you can identify it.

In low-resource settings there’s much smaller theatre teams, and the surgeon may not have someone to assist. The swabs are much smaller and harder to count, and one maternal death we saw was from a swab left in the abdomen – she died of sepsis.

Is the anaesthesia dangerous?

9 times out of 10 the anaesthesia is absolutely fine – but when something goes wrong, it suddenly makes the whole thing very dangerous.

When I arrived, a woman died of a high spinal – an anaesthetic that goes too far up the spine so that the patient can’t breath – because the anaesthesia provider hadn’t been trained to manage the emergency. In the U.K. that would never happen; the patient would be intubated, ventilated, or the anaesthesia would be reversed. Instead, a woman came in for a C-section and died from spinal anaesthesia.

And the long-term consequences?

There’s the impact for the next baby. In the U.K. we can offer mothers a second C-section if they choose, or monitor the second pregnancy closely to make sure that her scar doesn’t rupture.

But in Uganda, what will she do when she goes back to her village, three days walk away, and is laboring with the next one? Who will monitor them when the baby is obstructed? Who will be there to deliver her safely?

What is the impact on hospital staff?

We had two doctors running 4000 deliveries a year, 24 hours a day – no breaks, no weekends. We were losing about 5 women a month, roughly, we were losing babies every day. It’s crisis mode the whole time, and you could never even find half an hour to sit with everyone together because the workload doesn’t ever stop.